Naming Convention Guide

Files are acquired from a variety of sources. The GLCF aims to provide spatial data in standard formats, including naming conventions, while also trying to maintain the original name whenever possible. This guide is provided to explain naming conventions so that users better identify necessary files. Anyone with questions may contact the GLCF directly.

Note that most of the naming conventions for imagery and derived products available through the GLCF retain all or a portion of the protocols established by the collection sources. Some collections have multiple naming conventions because they are derived from multiple sources. Most collections have more detailed technical guides or other documentation online.

Some beginning nomenclature: a scene is one entire acquisition a representation of a place at a specific time. It contains all the imagery from a sensor for that single acquisition, often broken into separate files, by band. A scene also contains additional associated files, including metadata and preview and browse images. The GLCF policy is to keep each scene in an individual folder/directory. An extension is that part of a file name which appears as a suffix, separated from the main name with a period ".". Software may drop extensions when copying, so verify filenames after each copy and rename as needed.

Imagery and Products

  • Landsat SR ESDR
  • GLS Collection
  • ASTER Imagery
  • IKONOS Imagery
  • Landsat Imagery
  • MODIS Composites Imagery
  • QuickBird Imagery
  • OrbView Imagery
  • SRTM Imagery
  • AVHRR Land Cover Products
  • GIMMS Products
  • GloPEM Products
  • MODIS VCC Products
  • MODIS VCF Products
  • MODIS NDVI Products
  • Landsat Land Cover Products
  • Landsat Mosaics Products
  • Landsat Degree Subsets
  • Radiative Fluxes Products

Landsat Surface Reflectance Earth Science Data Records (SR ESDR)

The Landsat Surface Reflectance Earth Science Data Record (ESDR) comprises of mostly GLS 2000 and GLS2005 images converted to Top-of-Atmosphere reflectance and to Surface Reflectance to enable analyses based on biophysical units of measurement.

Landsat SR ESDR (1999-2007):

Sensors used: Landsat TM & ETM+

Directory structure:

pxxxrxxx_[5,7]dxyyymmdd.SR.ESDR

This naming convention can be broken down into following sections:

p[path]r[row]_[Landsat mission]d[band type][year][month][day].SR.ESDR.
Here, bandtype refers to: t- multispectral, k- thermal,x-all bands or band specific product

File structure:

pxxxrxxx_[5,7]d[t,x,k]yyyymmdd.SR.bxx.tif.gz

Example image filename: p129r032_7dt20000611.SR.b01.tif.gz

  • The path and row of the scene are 129 and 032
  • The Landsat mission number: In this case, the mission number is 7.
  • 'd'=Flag to note Tri-Decadal geodetic standard separate from original Scientific Data Purchase products
  • which have the same naming convention, minus the 'd'
  • band type 't' stands for multispectral
  • The acquisition date is 2000:06:11 represented as 20000611
  • The band number for this file is represented as 01 (band 1). Other bands in the directory may be referred to as 02,03, and so on.
  • SR.ESDR refers to the type of Earth Science Data Record (ESDR). In this case, it is the Surface Reflectance (SR) dataset.

Metadata file structure:

pxxxrxxx_[5,7]dxyyyymmdd.SR.met.txt

Example metadata filename: p129r032_7dx20000611.SR.met.txt

The parameters in the metadata filenames are the same as those of directory structure. All metadata have a *.met.txt extension.

SR validation file structure:

Example validation plot file: p129r032_7dx20000611.SRvalidation_plot.png

The paramters in the filenames are the same as those of the directory and file structures. The Landsat Surface Reflectance bands are validated against the corresponding MODIS Surface Reflectance bands after which scatter validation plots are produced with statistical metrics for assessment.


GLS Collection

The GLS collection is made up of mostly Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+ scenes, with EO-1 ALI scenes providing island coverage in the GLS2005 collection. Due to a mix of satellites and sensors used, the naming conventions in the GLS collection vary by epochs and by sensors. The naming conventions used for each of the sensors in the collection are explained in the section below, broken down by epochs.

GLS 1975, 1990 and GLS 2000:

Sensors used: Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+

File format: pppprrrr_ld[t,p,k or m]yyyymmdd_zzz_bb.tif.gz
This naming convention can be broken down into the following sections:
p[path]r[row]_[Landsatmission]d[bandtype][year][month][day]_z[UTMzone]_[bandnumber].tif.gz
Here, bandtype refers to: t-TM and ETM+ multispectral, k-ETM+ thermal, p-ETM+ panchromatic, m- MSS multispectral

Example image filename: p129r032_7dt20000611_z48_10.tif.gz

  • The path and row of the scene are 129 and 032.
  • The Landsat mission number: 3, 4, 5 or 7; in this case, the mission number is 7.
  • 'd'=Flag to note Tri-Decadal geodetic standard separate from original Scientific Data Purchase products which have the same naming convention, minus the 'd'
  • band type 't' stands for ETM+ multispectral.
  • The acquisition date is 2000-06-11, represented as 20000611.
  • The band number for this file is represented as 10 (band 1). Other bands in the file may be referred to as 20 (band2), 30 (band 3) and so on.

Metadata: p129r032_7dt20000611.met

The naming convention for each of the fields in the metadata is the same as that of the scene with the band numbers and the UTM zone excluded from its filename. All metadata in the GLS 1990 and GLS 2000 collections have a '.met' extension.

GLS 2005:

Sensors used: Landsat TM, ETM+ and EO-1 ALI

For ETM+ scenes:

File format: L7fppprrr_rrryyyymmdd_AAA.TIF.gz
This naming convention can be broken down into the following sections: [Landsat-7 mission][ETM+ data format][path][starting row]_[ending row][year][month][day]_B[bandnumber].TIF.gz

Example image filename: L71129032_03220060815_B10.TIF.gz

  • In the above example, L7 refers to the Landsat-7 mission, followed by "1" which refers to the ETM+ data format.
  • 129 is the path of the scene, followed by 032_032 which are the starting and ending rows of the scene.
  • The acquisition data is 2006-08-15, represented as 20060815.
  • The band number for this file is B10 (band1). Other bands in the file may be referred to as B20 (band2), B30 (band3) and so on.

Metadata:L71129032_03220060815_MTL.TIF,L71129032_03220060815_MTL.txt

The naming convention for each of the fields in the metadata is the same as that of the scene with the band numbers excluded from its filename. The metadata for ETM+ scenes in the GLS2005 collection ends with 'MTL.TIF' or 'MTL.txt' extensions.

For TM scenes:

File format: L7fppprrr_rrryyyymmdd_AAA.TIF.gz
This naming convention can be broken down into the following sections: [Landsat-7 mission][ETM+ data format][path][starting row]_[ending row][year] [month][day]_B[bandnumber].TIF.gz

Example image filename: L5129032_03220060815_B10.TIF.gz

  • In the above example, L5 refers to the Landsat-5 mission.
  • 129 is the path of the scene, followed by 032_032 which are the starting and ending rows of the scene.
  • The acquisition data is 2006-08-15, represented as 20060815.
  • The band number for this file is B10 (band1). Other bands in the file may be referred to as B20 (band2), B30 (band3) and so on.

Metadata: L5129032_03220060815_MTL.txt

The naming convention for each of the fields in the metadata is the same as that of the scene with the the band numbers excluded from its filename. Metadata for TM scenes in the GLS 2005 collection end with a 'MTL.txt' extension.

For ALI scenes:

File format: EO1SPPPRRRYYYDDDXXXML_BBB_TTT.TIF.gz
This naming convention can be broken down into the following sections:[Satellitename][Sensor][Target path][Target row][Year][Day of Year][Sensor on/off mode][Pointing mode][scene length]_[Band number]_[Data processing level].TIF.gz

  1. EO1= Satellite
  2. S= Sensor (H=Hyperion, A=ALI)
  3. PPP= Target WRS Path
  4. RRR= Target WRS Row
  5. YYYY= Year of acquisition
  6. DDD= Julian day of acquisition
  7. X= (0=off; 1=on) Hyperion
  8. X= (0=off; 1=on) Advanced Land Imager (ALI)
  9. X= (0=off; 1=on) Linear Imaging Spectrometer Array Atmospheric Corrector (AC)
  10. M= Pointing Mode (N=Nadir; P=Pointed within path/row,K= Pointed outside path/row)
  11. L= Scene Length (F=Full scene, P=Partial scene, Q=Second partial scene, S= Swath, * Other letters may be used to create distinct entity IDs)
  12. BBB= Spectral band type and number (B01, BO2...B10)
  13. TTT= Data processing level. Currently, Level 1 Gst data that are radiometrically corrected and orthorectified using DEMs are offered.

Metadata: EO1A0730912007227110P1_MTL_L1T.TIF

The naming convention for each of the fields in the metadata is the same as that of the scene with the band numbers excluded from its filename. Metadata for the ALI scenes in the GLS2005 collection end with a 'MTL_L1T.TIF' extension.


ASTER Imagery:

The GLCF ASTER collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of eighteen files that are available for one:

AST_L1B_003_05042000161340_04192003214859.B01.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [sensor]_[processing level]_[processing version]_[acquisition date and time]_[processing date and time].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene, or its "ID" is everything up to the first period: AST_L1B_003_05042000161340_04192003214859. The first section reflects the name of the sensor "AST", indicating that this scene was acquired using the ASTER sensor on board the NASA Terra satellite. The next section indicates the processing level, "L1B". The "003" indicates the processing version.

The next section includes the acquisition time as "05042000161340", which can be broken down as "MMDDYYYY" of the observation date, and "HHMMSS" of the observation time. For this example, the section translates as the scene being acquired on May 4, 2000, at 16:13 hours and 40 seconds, UTC.

The next section is similar to the acquisition time, except that it reflects when the scene was processed. This date and time should always be later than the observation date and time. The example of "04192003214859" can be translated to say the scene was processed on April 19, 2003, at 21:48 hours and 59 seconds.

The first extension in this example, ".B01", indicates the band number. ASTER has fourteen bands, with two editions of band 3. The example translates to say "Band 1". The second extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

In addition to the image files, which all end with ".tif" or ".tif.gz", there is a preview and browse image for each scene. These will have the same primary name as the other scene files (example: AST_L1B_003_05042000161340_04192003214859), but will also include a ".browse.jpg" or ".preview.jpg" extension. Any ".jpg" file should open fine in a browser, paint, or image viewing software. These files are not spatially coded, but are made available so the user can visually review the scene, at least at a coarse resolution.

The metadata file has a ".hdf.met" extension, and contains much valuable information regarding the scene origins, coordinates and processing. This is a text file that can be opened using any text editor or word processor.


IKONOS Imagery:

The GLCF IKONOS collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 21 to 23 files available in one IKONOS:

po_37757_blu_0000000.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [container_ID]_[band]_[series].[file format].[compression]

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the first period except for the "_blu". For this example, the scene ID would be "po_37757_0000000". Sometimes, this can be shortened to just "po_37757" because the zeros are not always needed. The zeros represent the series. If this scene was acquired without any adjacent scenes then the zeros can be ignored. If, however, another scene was acquired next to this scene that would be dependent upon the first scene, and would have a "1" among the zeros.

The band indicated in the example is the blue band, represented as "blu". The green band would be listed as "grn", the Near Infrared band as "nir", the panchromatic as "pan" and the red as "red".

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

Each band has three files: the main image with a ".tif.gz" extension, a header file with some descriptive text in a ".hdr" file, and a GeoTIFF world file with a ".tfw" extension. The latter two can be read as text files. Most software will require all three files to properly read the GeoTIFF. A user may ignore the latter two files if the image will only be used in an image display program, without spatial reference.

The "_metadata.txt" file provides the detailed acquisition, processing and coordinate information which enhances the value of each scene. This file should be copied for reference with each scene.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, using the red, green and blue bands, also known as an "RGB" or "3,2,1" combination. The scene is delivered with browse imagery too, with bands in an "RGB" or an "NRG" (4,3,2) combination, as well as the panchromatic band "pan". These JPEGs have a ".tar" extension as well, though this is a legacy item that can be ignored. Finally, two histogram JPEGs are provided by the proprietor, each ending with a ".hgram.jpg" extension. These graphs represent the spectral values for each band, with the four multi-spectral bands (blue, green, red and Near Infrared) on the "_msi" histogram, and the panchromatic band on the "_pan" histogram.


Landsat Imagery:

The Landsat collection at the GLCF was provided from many sources, with multiple file formats. Consequently, there are several naming conventions.

Please note that there have been seven Landsat satellites to date. The GLCF provides imagery from Landsat 1 through Landsat 5, plus Landsat 7. Three sensors have been used through the thirty years of Landsat: MSS (on 1-5), TM (on 4 & 5), and ETM+ (on 7). MSS imagery has four bands, TM has seven bands, and ETM+ has seven multi-spectral bands (including two versions of band 6), plus Landsat 7 includes a panchromatic band.

Landsat GeoCover Imagery:

The Landsat GeoCover collection is an orthorectified set of Landsat from three epochs: 1972-1980, 1990 and 2000, with imagery from the MSS, TM and ETM+ sensors, respectively. The following example is one of 9 to 14 files available in one Landsat GeoCover:

p015r033_5t870516_nn1.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections:[path][row]_[sensor][acquisition date]_[band].[file format].[compression]

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything through the acquisition date. For this example, the scene ID would be "p015r033_5t870516".

The first section indicates the Path and Row numbers. Landsat scenes are located in a tile system called WRS-2. Each tile has a path and row designation, which makes it easy to locate scenes. The path for this example is 15, indicated by "p015" and the row is 33, as indicated by "r033".

The second section indicates the satellite on the first character, and sensor on the second character, where "m"="MSS", "t"="TM" or, if this is Landsat 7, then "t"="ETM+". Therefore, the example of "_5t" translates as satellite Landsat 5, sensor Thematic Mapper (TM). The rest of the second section lists the acquisition date, either as YYYYMMDD or YYMMDD. This example of "870516" translates as May 16, 1987.

Some image files have an additional section, similar to "_z18"; which translates as UTM zone 18, where this scene is located in the UTM coordinate system. The band section may or may not have "nn" at the beginning, which translates as the nearest neighbor resampling method was used for this scene. The band number "1" from the example translates as band 1. For Landsat 7 files, an extra digit is provided so that band 1 is listed as "nn10"; this is still band 1, and not band 10.

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

Landsat GeoCover scenes are accompanied by a primary metadata file, with the extension ".met"; readable as a text file. Currently, the MSS and TM files hold the original metadata from the source Landsat imagery, and do not contain orthorectification parameters; this metadata is not current to the current processing level. MSS and TM scenes will usually include a more detailed ".hdr" metadata file, though this is also for the source data and does not reflect current processing level or projection.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files is included for viewing purposes with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, using the Short-wave Infrared, Near Infrared and green bands, or "5,4,2" combination. The scene is provided with alternate browse imagery too, with bands in a "7,2,4" combination. Some MSS and TM scenes have JPEGs with a ".tar" extension as well, with the original browse image.

Landsat L1G Imagery:

Landsat imagery in the L1G processing level is available from the GLCF Landsat collection. Note that some MSS scenes in L1G format follow the Landsat GeoCover naming convention. Otherwise, the following example is one of 14 files available in one Landsat L1G:

L71015033_03320000409_B10.L1G.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [satellite][sensor][path][starting row]_[ending row][acquisition date]_[band].[file format][compression].

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the acquisition date. For this example, the scene ID would be "L71015033_03320000409".

In this system, the satellite is provided first, as "L7", translating as Landsat 7. The sensor is next, with "1" translating as ETM+. The next three digits are the WRS2 Path, "015", and the starting WRS2 Row "033". The starting row is often the same as the ending row, but the ending row is listed as well at the beginning of the next section, as "_033". Next is the acquisition date, as YYYYMMDD, or "20000409" in this example, translating as April 9, 2000.

Bands are indicated in the third section, in this example as "_B10", translating as band 1. Note that an extra digit is provided, to facilitate the two editions of band 6. Be careful to read the example as band 1, and not band 10. MSS and TM scenes may not have the extra digit in their naming schemes.

The first extension in this example, ".L1G", indicates the file format is L1G. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A variety of files (not all are in every scene), including extensions ".ddr", ".HDF" and ".MTL", contain metadata and processing descriptions. These files may be read in any text editor or word processor.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene. These are created using the Short-wave Infrared, Near Infrared and green bands, or "5,4,2" combination.

Landsat FAST Imagery:

Landsat imagery in the Fast format is available from the GLCF Landsat collection. The following example is one of 15 files available in one Landsat Fast:

L71015033_03320000324_B10.fst.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [satellite][sensor][path][starting row]_[ending row][acquisition date]_[band].[file format][compression].

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the acquisition date. For this example, the scene ID would be "L71015033_03320000324".

In this system, the satellite is provided first, as "L7", translating as Landsat 7. The sensor is next, with "1" translating as ETM+. The next three digits are the WRS2 Path, "015", and the starting WRS2 Row "033". The starting row is often the same as the ending row, but the ending row is listed as well at the beginning of the next section, as "_033". Next is the acquisition date, as YYYYMMDD, or "20000324" in this example, translating as March 24, 2000.

Bands are indicated in the third section, in this example as "_B10", translating as band 1. Note that an extra digit is provided, to facilitate the two editions of band 6. Be careful to read the example as band 1, and not band 10.

The first extension in this example, ".fst", indicates the file format is Fast. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

The ".HPN.fst", ".HRF.fst", ".HTM.fst", and "README" files contain metadata and processing descriptions. These files may be read in any text editor or word processor.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene. These are created using the Short-wave Infrared, Near Infrared and green bands, or "5,4,2" combination.

Landsat NLAPS Imagery:

Landsat imagery in the NLAPS processing output is available from the GLCF Landsat collection. The following example is one of 10 to 17 files available in one Landsat NLAPS:

LM4015034008229090.I1.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [satellite and sensor][number of files][path][row][unexplained].[band number].[compression].

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the first period. For this example, the scene ID would be "LM4015034008229090".

The first section includes the satellite and sensor, such as the example "LM", indicating this imagery is from a Landsat satellites MSS sensor. The "4" indicates there are four files in this scene. The WRS-1 path and row are "015" and "034", respectively. The next portion in the example "008229090" is not explained.

The first extension represents the band name; in this example "I1" translates as band 1. In this file system, the second version of band 6 in Landsat 7/ETM+ scenes is named ".I9", translating as a fictional band 9.

The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

Header files in this format have an extension such as ".H1", translating as header file 1. Some Landsat 7 scenes will include a full metadata file using a ".MTL" extension. Other metadata information can be found in the ".HI" (job report) and ".WO" (job history) files. A readme file may also accompany scenes, usually containing a description of the processing system. All these files can be read in a text editor.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, using the Short-wave Infrared, Near Infrared and green bands, or "5,4,2" combination. The scene is provided with alternate browse imagery too, with bands in a "7,2,4" combination. Some MSS and TM scenes have JPEGs with a ".tar" extension as well, with the original browse image.


MODIS Composites Imagery:

The GLCF MODIS Composites imagery collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 9 files available in one MODIS composite:

Goodes.NA.2000321.band1.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [projection].[tile].[date].[band].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the third period. For this example, the scene ID would be "Goodes.NA.2000321".

The first section of this name indicates the projection: "Goodes" translates to the Goodes Homolosine Composite Projection. he other option for this first section, "LatLong" indicates the file is in geographic coordinates. The tiling scheme breaks down the global collection into continents, indicated in the second section by ".NA", translating as "North America". The third section indicates the scene date. Since these composites represent an amalgam of multiple daily scenes, the day represented here is the first for this composite. In this example, ".2000321" translates as day 321 in the year 2000. If this is a 16-day composite, this scene is a synthesis of daily images from December 26 (day 321) through January 10.

The seven bands provided as separate files in the MODIS composite scene are named specifically. This example includes ".band1", indicating band 1.

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, approximating a True Color display, using bands 1 (red), 4 (green) and 3 (blue).


QuickBird Imagery:

The GLCF QuickBird collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 12 files available in one QuickBird:

02jun09154957-m2as-000000037901_01_p001.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [acquisition date and time]-[bands][processing level][series]-[internal ID].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene, or its ID, is everything up to the first period except for the "-m2as". For this example, the scene ID would be "02jun09154957 -000000037901_01_p001".

This is one collection where the GLCF does not store bands independently. For QuickBird scenes, all multi-spectral bands are contained in one file, indicated by the "-m2as" in the file name. This one file is a stack of all four multi-spectral images: the blue, green, red and Near Infrared bands. The single panchromatic band is indicated by the "-p2as" in the file name. This is DigitalGlobe as convention.

The first section of the name provides the acquisition time. The example "02jun09154957" indicates the scene was collected on June 9, 2002, at 15:49 hours and 57 seconds, UTC. The second section indicates the product type, where "m2as" is translated as saying multi-spectral (m), processing level 2a (2a), and a single scene (s).The final set of numbers, "000000037901_01_p001" are the scenes internal identification, translated in three sections as the order ID, the increment and the offset.

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

Both the panchromatic "-p2as" and the multi-spectral "-m2as" image files are accompanied by three metadata files. The extensions ".imd", ".rpb", and ".til" files are text files providing scene characteristics. These files should be copied for reference with each scene.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, using the Near Infrared, red, and green bands, also known as an "NRG" (4,3,2) combination. This same combination is available from the proprietor with the ".tar.jpg" extension, as well as for the panchromatic band. These JPEGs have a ".tar" extension as well, though this is a legacy item that can be ignored.


OrbView Imagery:

The GLCF OrbView collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 2 files available in one OrbView:

OrbView_U_0009012_00443640_8-India_Chilika_Lake.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [sensor]_[other_internal_identifications]_ [series]-[place].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene is everything up to the first extension, or period. For example, "OrbView_U_0009012_00443640_8-India_Chilika_Lake" is the name or ID of the scene, though the fourth and fifth elements can also be used as a shortened version of the name, as "443640_8".

The first section lists the sensor as "OrbView". The fifth element of the name, "_8" in this example, indicates the series number. This example is scene 8 of a series of scenes. The example indicates a specific place "-India_Chilika_Lake", translated as the scene being located at Chilika Lake in India.

A JPEG file accompanies the image file, using the extension ".jpg". This is a non-spatial file available for quick display of the image. The metadata file has a ".pvl" extension, and should be copied with each scene. This file can be read with any text editor or word processor.


SRTM Imagery:

The GLCF SRTM collection has three naming conventions, including one for Degree tiles and GTOPO30 tiles, another for WRS2 tiles, and one for the GTOPO30 mosaic file.

SRTM Degree Tiles and SRTM GTOPO30 Tiles:

The following example is one of 3 to four files available in one SRTM Degree tiles:

SRTM_u03_n038w077.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [sensor]_[processing level][resolution]_[latitude] [longitude].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene includes everything up to the first extension, as in this example "SRTM_u03_n038w077".

The first section identifies the sensor. SRTM was collected once, so there are no dates or variations in sensor. The second section identifies the processing level and resolution, as in this example the "_u03" translates as the USGS "unfinished" edition, for 3 arc seconds resolution. The other options for resolution are "01", for 1 arc seconds, and "GTOPO" for 30 arc seconds.

The Degree tiling system divides the world into a grid where the grid lines intersect at every interval of one degree latitude and longitude. For this section, the example "n038w077" can be translated to say the lower left corner of this image is located at 38 degrees north in latitude and 77 degrees west in longitude. The GTOPO30 tiling system follows a similar grid and naming system, but tiles cover a much larger area.

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

SRTM WRS-2 Tiles:

The following example is one of 3 to four files available in one SRTM WRS-2 tiles:

SRTM_u01_p015r033.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [sensor]_[processing level][resolution]_[WRS2 path] [WRS2 row].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene includes everything up to the first extension, as in this example "SRTM_u03_ p015r033".

This tiling system follows the same naming convention as the SRTM Degree Tiles Imagery except for the location information. In the WRS-2 Tiles edition, the WRS-2 path and row are included instead of latitude and longitude, in this example as "p015r033", translating as path 15 and row 33.

All other sections of this naming convention should follow the system for SRTM Degree tiles.

SRTM GTOPO30 Mosaic:

The following example is one of 3 to four files available in one SRTM GTOPO30 mosaic file set:

SRTM_GTOPO_u30_mosaic.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [sensor]_[source]_[processing level][resolution]_ [coverage].[file format].[compression].

The name of the scene includes everything up to the first extension, as in this example "SRTM_GTOPO_u30_mosaic". There are no tiles as this mosaic has global coverage. Follow the SRTM Degree Tiles naming convention for further details.


GIMMS Products:

The GLCF GIMMS collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of four files available in one GIMMS:

90dec15b.n11-VIg_data.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections [location][date][month portion].[satellite]-[data type]_ [purpose].[file format].[compression].

The name of the product set includes everything up to the first underline. In this example the name, or name ID, is "90dec15b.n11-VIg".

If the file is from the global portion of the mosaic then there is no location information. If, however, the file is from the continental subset portion of the collection then there will be an identifier at the beginning of the file name. For example, if this were a file containing North America there would be a prefix "NA" in the first section. This example as first section is the date of coverage, so the assumption is that this is a global mosaic file.

The date in this example is "90dec15", which can be read as December 15, 1990. The "b" in this example qualifies the date as indicating this file covers imagery for the second half of December, beginning Dec 16. An "a" would indicate the first half of the month.

The satellite section indicates the number of the NOAA satellite from which the imagery was collected; in this example "n11" translates as NOAA-11. The data type is always "V1g" in this collection, indicating NDVI.

The purpose section indicates if this file contains the primary image "data", or if this is a "flag".

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.


GloPEM Products:

The GLCF GloPEM collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 3 files available in one GloPEM:

1987_121_130_npp_latlon.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [year]_[start day]_[end day]_[product]_[projection].[file format].[compression].

The name of the product set includes everything up to the first extension. In this example the name, or name ID, is "1987_121_130_npp_latlon".

While the first section is in all GloPEM image files, the start day and end day are only on the 10-day files, and are not on the annual summary files. Therefore, this example is translated as being imagery starting from day 121 of 1987 and ending day 130. This example is a 10-day product.

All GloPEM product file names indicate this is a Net Primary Production (npp) product, and all are in geographic coordinates (latlon).

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.


AVHRR Land Cover Products:

The GLCF AVHRR land cover products collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 1 file available in one AVHRR land cover products:

gl-goodes-treecover.bin.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [location]-[projection]-[resolution]-[feature].[file format].[compression]. This example does not include a resolution section.

The name of the product set includes everything up to the first extension. In this example the name, or name ID, is "gl-goodes-treecover".

Location is indicated in the first section, where "gl" translates as global coverage. The second section indicates the projection; in this example "goodes" translates as the Goodes Homolosine Composite Projection. Other options include "geog" or "latlon" to indicate geographic coordinate, or "albers" to indicate an Albers projection.

This example lists "treecover" as the land cover feature included in this file. Other options are for derivatives of that tree cover product, including "broadleaf", "deciduous", "evergreen", and "needleleaf".

The tree cover products do not include a resolution section in their names. The land cover products do have a resolution section, where "1km" indicates 1 kilometer resolution, "8km" indicates 8 kilometer resolution and "1deg" indicates a 1 degree resolution.

The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" or ".glcf" file containing metadata is available.


Radiative Fluxes Products:

The GLCF Radiative Fluxes collection has only one naming convention. The following is a file example:

9001vsua_day.biglba

This can be broken into several section [year][month][product]_[period].[project].

The first section in this example "9001vsua" can be translated as a Visible Surface Up product for month 1 of 1990. The second section indicates the time period, where "day" translates into a daily product, and "mon" represents the other option of a monthly product.


Landsat Forest Change Products:

The GLCF Landsat forest change products collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 1 file available in one Landsat forest change products:

Bolivia-1980-v1.3.e00.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [location]-[year]-[version].[file format].[compression].

The name of the product set includes everything up to the file format. In this example the name, or name ID, is "Bolivia-1980-v1.3".

Location is contained within the first extension, usually a country; in this example "Bolivia" translates as the file covers Bolivia. The second section indicates the year represented by the file; in this example "1980" indicates the file represents land cover as of 1980. The volume is indicated in the third section; in this example "v1.3" translates as this represents version 1.3 of this product.

The file format for this collection is the ESRI interchange format, as indicated by the example ".e00". This file will open in many spatial software packages but will need to be imported first, from the e00 format to an ESRI Grid raster GIS file. Note that when this file is imported correctly there will be two folders including one named "info" and one named the same as the file. Both folders are needed for the operation of this file.

The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, may be included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" file containing metadata is available.


Landsat Mosaics:

The GLCF Landsat GeoCover mosaics collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 5 to 6 files available in one Landsat GeoCover mosaics:

N-11-30_loc.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [hemisphere][UTM zone][latitude]_[collection filler].[file format].[compression].

This can be broken into several sections: [hemisphere][UTM zone][latitude]_[collection filler].[file format].[compression].

The first two sections of the file are the name of the mosaic, where this example mosaic name is "N-11-30_loc".

The first section indicates the hemisphere, where "N" is north, then the UTM zone, where "11" is UTM zone 11, and then the mosaics latitude closest to the equator, where "30" is 30 degrees latitude.

There are two choices for file format in this collection, either GeoTIFF, as indicated in this example by the ".tif" extension, or Mr.Sid format, which would be indicated by a ".sid" extension. Compression is only listed for GeoTIFF files, with a ".gz" extension, as Mr.Sid files are compressed internally.

The Mr.Sid format has a dependent file in addition to the primary ".sid" file. This dependent file has a ".sdw" extension and must be copied along with the ".sid" file.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene. A browse file from the original source is also available, with a ".tar.jpg" extension.

Metadata is contained in the ".met" files for Mr.Sid format, and ".ip3" files for GeoTIFF format. The ".met" files have far more detail, and should be consulted by GeoTIFF users for determining source imagery.


Landsat GeoCover Degree Subsets Version 1:

The GLCF Landsat GeoCover Degree Subsets, Version 1 collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 9 files available in one Degree Subsets, Version 1:

e010n001_LSATB_19890204.b10.tif

This can be broken into several sections: [latitude][longitude]_[internal code]_[acquisition date]. [band][file format].

The scene name consists of everything up to the first period. In this example the scene name, or scene ID, is "e010n001_LSATB_19890204". This can be shortened to include just the first portion, "e010n001".

This collection is a subset of the Landsat GeoCover TM collection. At every intersection of one degree latitude and longitude a TM scene was subset. The first section of the name relays these coordinates, with "e010" in the example translating as 10 degrees east in longitude, and "n001" translating as one degree north in latitude.

Acquisition time is related in the third section, with "19890204" translating as the scene being acquired on February 4, 1989.

The first extension states the band number, where the example ".b10" is translated to indicate this file is band 1. Ignore the zeros.

The final extension indicates the file format, where ".tif" translates as GeoTIFF. This collection files are not compressed, so there is no ".gz" at the end of the file name.

Landsat GeoCover scenes are accompanied by a primary metadata file, with the extension ".met"; readable as a text file.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files is included for viewing purposes with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene, using the Short-wave Infrared, Near Infrared and green bands, or "7,4,2" combination.

Landsat GeoCover Degree Subsets Version 2:

The GLCF Landsat GeoCover Degree Subsets, Version 2 collection has only one naming convention. This follows the Landsat GeoCover Imagery naming convention, above, except there is an additional first section with latitude and longitude coordinates indicating the subset location within the original Landsat 7 scene.


MODIS VCC Products: Collection 4 Edition

The GLCF MODIS VCC Collection 4 has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 3 files available in one MODIS VCC:

MOD44A_BUR.2004.HG1718.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [collection name].[product name].[year].[tile].[file format].[compression].

The scene name consists of everything up to the third period. In this example the scene name, or scene ID, is "MOD44A_BUR.2004.HG1718".

The first portion of the first section indicates the official collection name for VCC: MOD44A. This is the designation made by the NASA MODIS science team for this collection. The second portion of the first section indicates the product name; in this example "BUR" indicates the file represents "Burned Area Land Cover". The second section is the year of coverage, where "2004" indicates this product represents land cover for an entire year. The third section indicates the GLCF tile covered by this file: UTM rows H and G, and UTM zones 17 and 18.

The file format in this example is ".tif", translated as GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, may be included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" file containing metadata may be available.


MODIS VCF Products: Collection 3 Edition

The GLCF MODIS VCF Collection 3 has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 7 files available in one MODIS VCF:

Goodes.AF.2001.AllFiles.tar.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [projection].[location].[year].[feature].[file format].[compression].

The scene name consists of everything up to the third period. In this example the scene name, or scene ID, is "Goodes.AF.2001".

The first section indicates the projection for this edition of VCF. In this example "Goodes" indicates the file is in a Goodes Homolosine Composite projection. Other options may be "LatLon" for geographic coordinates or "Albers" for an Albers projection. The second section indicates the tile name; in this example "AF" indicates the file coverage is all of Africa. The third section is the year of coverage, where "2001" indicates imagery for each month in 2001 was used to process the product.

The feature section indicates what the file focuses upon, where this example "AllFiles" can be translated to say that all feature options for VCF are included. The other options are "Bare" for bare ground, "Herb" for herbaceous cover, and "Tree" for tree cover. These features refer to the type of land cover.

The file format in this example is ".tar", which translates as saying this file contains a tar format group of other files. The tar file contains the individual products for this location and date, including the Bare, Herb and Tree files. The actual products are indicated by ".tif", where the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" file containing metadata is available.

MODIS VCF Products: Collection 4 Edition

The GLCF MODIS VCF Collection 4 has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 3 files available in one MODIS VCF:

MOD44B_TRE.2003.HG2122.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [collection name].[product name].[year].[tile].[file format].[compression].

The scene name consists of everything up to the third period. In this example the scene name, or scene ID, is "MOD44B_TRE.2003.HG2122".

The first portion of the first section indicates the official collection name for VCF: MOD44B. This is the designation made by the NASA MODIS science team for this collection. The second portion of the first section indicates the product name; in this example "TRE" indicates the file represents "Percent Tree Cover". The second section is the year of coverage, where "2003" indicates this product represents land cover for an entire year. The third section indicates the GLCF tile covered by this file: UTM rows H and G, and UTM zones 21 and 22.

The file format in this example is ".tif", translated as GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, may be included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" file containing metadata may be available.


MODIS NDVI Products: Collection 3 Edition

The GLCF MODIS NDVI collection has only one naming convention. The following example is one of 7 files available in one MODIS NDVI:

US.Albers.2001017.ndvi.tif.gz

This can be broken into several sections: [location].[projection].[year][day].[product].[file format].[compression].

The scene name consists of everything up to the fourth period. In this example the scene name, or scene ID, is "US.Albers.2001017.ndvi".

The first section of this naming convention provides the location of the file coverage; in this example "US" translates as covering the (48) United States. The second section indicates the file projection; in this example "Albers" translates as an Albers Equal Area Conic Conformal projection. The year in this example "2001" translates as this imagery product includes imagery collected in 2001. The day in this example "017" is the start day of the year for the collection of 16 daily images used to generate this product. The translation is that this product was created using imagery collected beginning on the seventeenth day of 2001.

The product section example "ndvi" indicates this is an NDVI product. The NDVI collection is accompanied by three related but distinct MODIS files, including the "b1" or Band 1, "b2" or Band 2, and the "cloud" product. These three files are processed to generate the NDVI output file. It is not necessary to copy these files, but they may be useful for reference.

The first extension in this example, ".tif", indicates the file format is GeoTIFF. The final extension in this example, ".gz", indicates the file is compressed using Gzip software, and must be uncompressed before being useful. The ".gz" extension will disappear when the file has been properly uncompressed.

A set of non-spatial JPEG image files, for viewing purposes only, is included with each scene. The GLCF creates a ".browse" and ".preview" JPEG for each scene.

Additionally, a ".txt" file containing metadata is available.

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